« Welcome to my blog | Main | Why increasing your Emotional and Social Intelligence guarantees that you get ahead »

30 September 2006

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8346251db69e200d8351302ce69e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference When passion is destructive:

Comments

Hi Antman

Thank you for your great comment. I agree with much of what you have said. The world is changing and requires the talent of the maverick to enable companies to achieve their goals and to survive in a shifting world.

I do believe passionately that mavericks are good for business especially if the right environment is created for them and the maverick is aware of their responsibilities within it. Both the company and the maverick need to work together if both parties are to survive and grow together.

Based on your comment you may like my short 4 minute video where I talk about the need for mavericks in business and how they can indeed be the company's greatest leaders. Please navigate here to watch: http://www.ivc4.com/judithgermain/managingmavericks.html

I also posted this on Ecademy and responded to comments there: http://www.ecademy.com/node.php?id=73896

Thank you for your comment.

Take care

Judith Germain

Antman

Good post, I too am passionate about leadership. I will challenge you on your assertion of the Maverick talent. Your post has merit, however your contention that mavericks are destructive is limited. I do agree with the statement that w/o good intent is not a good thing. However, intent is a subjective statement. Your post assumes that the organizations goals and objectives are sound and valid. However, in many cases it is the leadership of the maverick that saves an organization from complacency. It is the maverick that identifies problems, opportunities, hindrances that general the populace refuses to see. It is the maverick who has the ability to lead in difficult and challenging times that saves the day. It is easy to lead when leading through the norm. Leadership through change, or leadership for change is a far more impressive and difficult challenge. The most powerful leaders were disruptive. Their ability to lead through disruption is why they were great. MLK, was not a considered a leader by the establishment at the time. Cassius Clay was not perceived as a leader by many, when he chose to avoid the draft. MLK and CC were disrupter's. Don't be so quick to chalk up the mavericks as destructive. You may be ridding your organization of exactly what it needs, disruption.

The comments to this entry are closed.

My Photo

My Online Status

Subscribe to this blog

Your email address:


Powered by FeedBlitz

Or subscribe here

Leadership books

  • Reccommended books

Search Amazon

  • Lead yourself ...
Blog powered by Typepad

Google


  • World Wide Web
    This blog

Richard J White - Soft Selling

Interesting bloggers

Myblog community only - other readers not shown

  • Recent Readers

Coming soon


  • counter